Sarah, who runs the recipe blog Vintage Dish & Tell, includes some fascinating history on the origins of frog eye salad’s popularity in the midwest: Sarah first came across frog eye salad in a recipe book from 1992, pulled together by congregates of St. Philip’s Lutheran Church in Plymouth, Minnesota. The humorous name obviously refers to the pasta looking like frog's eyes. One message board for people who no longer practice the Mormon religion confess that they ate frog eye salad throughout their youth but never enjoyed it. Gradually stir in pineapple juice and eggs. Generally, fruit and pasta are not combined, but frog eye salad is a notable exception. It may have even been the reason we were invited;)! In 2014, the New York Times found that it was the most-searched-for Thanksgiving recipe in Colorado, Idaho, and Wyoming. This is also a lot like a fruit salad or ambrosia salad… For more information on how we use cookies consult our revised, The truth about artificial vanilla extract (and why you should always splurge for pure), Why you should be eating more zesty, spicy, delicious Indonesian food, 10 iconic Alaskan foods that show off the state’s abundant natural resources, 10 traditional Finnish foods from the happiest country in the world, The signature, iconic pie for every state in the US, How fried bull testicles became a Colorado delicacy, 7 remote mountain cabins near NY to escape to this winter, 7 dishes that make for a classic Midwest Thanksgiving, Florida’s first-ever snow amusement park is opening this month, The most beautiful American deserts to visit in winter for rocks, cactuses, and snow, Circa is downtown Vegas’ first new hotel in 40 years, and it has an epic aquatheater, How New England shaped what the country eats on Thanksgiving, This Arkansas region is luring remote workers to move there with $10,000 and a mountain bike, The coolest dome houses you can rent in the US, These fluffy, creamy, and decadent dessert salads are holiday staples in the Midwest, The most beautiful frozen waterscapes in the US to witness this winter, Drink your way across Texas wine country on this Christmas wine train, 9 tart and sweet traditional lemon desserts from around the world, How marshmallow-topped sweet potatoes became an American classic, 7 crunchy, nutty, and sweet Chinese sesame desserts, This Istanbul hotel has the world’s first baklava butler, How climate change will alter chocolate as we know it, The real difference between Swiss and Belgian chocolate, explained, The 5 American cities every candy lover needs to visit, 15 creamy, fruity, and indulgent ice cream styles from around the world, 7 decadent global cheesecake styles you need to try, Download the This delicious sweet fruit salad has tiny pasta, mandarin oranges, pineapple, whipped topping, marshmallows, coconut and sweet cherries. The next time we were invited back they requested that we bring this salad. It has a long history outside the LDS church, too. Frog-eye salad is particularly special in that it seems to be one of the only conflations of pasta salad and dessert salad around, so it presumably works as both an appetizer and nightcap. Frog Eye Salad 2. She managed to track down the lady credited with adding frog eye salad to the recipe cook, one Marlene Roberts. If you grew up or live outside of the Western United States — specifically Utah, Colorado, Idaho, or Wyoming — you’ve likely never encountered it before. To Make: This recipe is adapted from All Recipes Frog Eye Salad and makes ten servings. That, or a “staple” that aunts and moms brought to potlucks and holiday dinners. Unlike traditional ambrosia, which is a combination of marshmallows, whipped cream, and canned fruit, frog eye salad is technically a pasta salad. I did make another jello salad too. Though there’s no hard evidence that points to the exact origins of frog eye salad, the general consensus is that it was most likely invented in the kitchens of Mormon housewives. Especially popular in Utah, Colorado, Idaho, or Wyoming, frog eye salad is technically a sweet pasta salad: The main ingredient is a tiny bead-shaped pasta called acini di pepe. The pasta also creates a texture similar to rice pudding or tapioca pudding. Frog-eye salad is particularly special in that it seems to be one of the only conflations of pasta salad and dessert salad around, so it presumably works as both an appetizer and nightcap. Thanks for taking the Frog Eye family. Sarah, who runs the recipe blog Vintage Dish & Tell, includes some fascinating history on the origins of frog eye salad’s popularity in the midwest: Sarah first came across frog eye salad in a recipe book from 1992, pulled together by congregates of St. Philip’s Lutheran Church in Plymouth, Minnesota. Always quick to disappear at BBQs and potlucks! Since I’ve already shared my Cavatini multiple times I thought I better come up with something different today.