3.5 stars, rounded up. There's definitely some questionable fact-telling here that made me at times wonder about the accuracy of other chapters: (e.g. Some of the materials occur naturally like diamond and coal. Welcome back. Some of these interactions are simple, involving the changing of the shape and form, others are much more complex and involve heat and chemical interaction. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. • … No Tags, Be the first to tag this record. Mark Miodownik is Professor of Materials and Society at University College London and the Director of the UCL Institute of Making. Are you one of those people who once excitedly sat down to watch "How it's Made" only to be utterly disappointed by the fact that it's basically just a bunch of B-reel of machines doing everything and no narrated exploration as to what chemicals are used along with the whys and hows that allowed them to settle on their usage to begin with? Some of the materials occur naturally like diamond and coal. I first heard of Stuff Matters after scanning a random list of 2014’s best audiobooks. Using a photo of himself drinking a coffee and eating a bar of chocolate, Miodownik takes us through a range of different materials that you are likely to come across every day, such as glass, steel, plastics, concrete, paper and even cho. It seems odd to me, especially when the questions above provide a much broader avenues for cheerful and interesting conversation than conversational gambits which I have observed are more frequent, like “What do you do for a living?” and “How much did you pay for your house?”. Alternatively, use a telescope and a whole universe of possibilities will open up before you.”, Why don't we create something that is stretchy, that bends and we can see- through it. May 27th 2014 Pulitzer Prize–winning literary critic Michiko Kakutani, the former chief book critic of The New York Times, is the author of the newly... To see what your friends thought of this book. A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics. This is an entertaining, engaging book about many of the everyday--and rare--materials that are in our world. This is an interesting book. Refresh and try again. Take a magnifying glass to any part of your house and you will find a whole new world to explore. Mark Miodownik starts with the basics, concrete, dirt, and it's a science slide! I really enjoyed this book! Monday to Friday 9am to Noon, and 4pm to 7pm, 211 S. Allen Street Yes, it took me almost two years to read this book and I am glad that I didn't rush through it. But those who say this are usually referring to places that exist at the human scale. Start by marking “Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World” as Want to Read: Error rating book. Endless talks of the differing types of ceramics, stress versus strain...zzz. The only culinary book that Miodownik mentions in his recommended further reading is Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen," published in 1984. I loved this book and was scheming on the many ways I could get my peeps in the car on a road trip and slip this in on them. "Why is glass see-through? State College, PA 16801. We’d love your help. Good book, cool but a little skimpy. This was a pretty interesting look at the make-up and origins and useage of the stuff we use and take for granted every day. I'm assuming this is where he obtained his information, so I'm wondering if this "fact" is explained in the source material. STUFF MATTERS: Chapters 1-3 • On Stainless Steel • During the stone age, metals were extremely rare save for some deposits of copper and gold which were hard to find. It seems odd to me, especially when the questions above provide a much broader avenues for cheerful and interesting conversation than conversational gambits which I have observed are more frequent, “Why can you see through glass?” and “Why does paper fold neatly but not plastic wrap?” are the sort of questions that an arbitrary world believes are endearing when issuing from the mouth of some precocious moppet, but generate uncomfortable silences when voiced by a jowly middle-aged man, like self. Materials, such as steel, paper, concrete, glass and chocolate (to name a few covered in this book), do affect each and every one of us on a personal level; although we tend to take most of it for granted given its normality in our quotidian lives.