If the drummer plays very lightly, then there's a lot of attack and not a lot of tone, and I want the microphone to look at the contact point of the snare drum. I recorded this rig at three distances from the batter head: as close as possible ('KickHeadOnClose' and 'KickHeadOffClose' sets); about eight inches back ('KickHeadOnMid' and 'KickHeadOffMid' sets); and as far back towards the position of the resonant head as I could ('KickHeadOnFar' and 'KickHeadOffFar'). Listening to these files not only illustrates how dramatic the tonal variation can be even for mics at the same distance from the batter head, but also shows how the sound changes in a general way as you move the mic forwards or backwards. In the process, I've compared the snare- and kick-recording tricks of fifty high-profile producers, who are collectively responsible for hundreds of millions of record sales. The RE20 is fairly flat and has little proximity effect and great off-axis rejection. RE20/27 needs no EQ. D12 is a fine microphone outside the kick for extra low end capture. Agree. The Beatles: Abbey Road; Pink Floyd: Dark Side Of The Moon; Al Stewart: Year Of The Cat; The Hollies: 'He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother', 'The Air That I Breathe'. I do a lot of rock. "I used to take the front head off, with a cushion inside" says John Leckie, "but now I prefer to leave the front head on, but with a hole cut in it; it sounds a bit more contained.". Ambience mics are often used by producers to bolster the sound of both snare and kick close-mics, so we recorded some extra ambience mics for the 'Amb' files, to let you experiment with the possibilities they afford. Both Steve Churchyard and John Leckie mention, though, that such combination techniques can easily cause disastrous phase cancellation, just as with snare multi-miking, so be prepared to finesse mic positions and experiment with phase-inversion for the most solid sound. PreSonus StudioLive 32SC Series III Mixing Console. Alan Parsons used it on Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon, for example ("I could never get a sound I was happy with using any mic other than a KM84. "It's amazing how much the sound changes," remarks Steve Churchyard, "if you're completely on-axis to the kick-drum pedal beater rather than more off-axis and to the side of the kick drum." "I use a three-microphone technique on bass drum," says Eddie Kramer of his variant on this approach: "A Shure SM52 and SM91 inside the bass drum and a U47 FET outside the bass drum. .s5ap8yh1b4ZfwxvHizW3f{color:var(--newCommunityTheme-metaText);padding-top:5px}.s5ap8yh1b4ZfwxvHizW3f._19JhaP1slDQqu2XgT3vVS0{color:#ea0027} Not to say it's only good with jazz or anything...I find it just doesn't have as much attack or smack as I want on a rock type kick. Behind The Glass by Howard Massey (ISBN 0879306149), £16.95 including VAT. You can also adjust the timbre and level of beater sound by adjusting the angle of your mic. Ambience mics are often used by producers to bolster the sound of both snare and kick close-mics, so we recorded some extra ambience mics for the 'Amb' files, to let you experiment with the possibilities they afford. Like previously said, it's great in combo with a sub kick or a LDC. Most engineers recognise that the exact position and angle of the snare mic are very important considerations. The three different drums used for our 'SnareMics' audio files (left to right): a Ludwig Black Beauty 14x5-inch hammered-brass snare, an Orange County 14x5-inch maple snare, and a Gretsch 14x6.5-inch mahogany snare.Neumann's cardioid KM84 gives a much more neutral tonality, with a frequency response that's essentially flat between 100Hz and 15kHz, and only 2dB down at 50Hz and 20kHz, so it's eminently capable of capturing pretty much any instrument all on its own. For rates and discounts, see www.fxgroup.net. Robbie Adams (SOS March 1994 & July 1997). Even though it's being gated, you'll hear a big difference if you just play with the phase button, and you'll find that the low end will disappear if it's out of phase. For pop/rock/what have you, it just does not have the bite or punch to cut through a mix without heavy processing. The problem with miking inside the drum, though, is that the resonant modes within the shell cause the sound to vary much more for small changes in mic position than you might normally expect. My decision was also based on the fact I have a D112 and I think the RE320 is marginally better than the D112 for kick. On a practical note, though, I found it took a little while to find a position for this mic where the snare level rose above the cymbal spill, so if you do decide to give it a go, make sure to work with the placement for the best results. I like the head being on there.” Advertisement. There are also two interesting panel discussions where several of the featured producers discuss their trade head to head. Five classic snare mics were compared over the top of the drum for the 'SnareMics' audio files (left, clockwise from top left): a Neumann KM84, a Shure SM57, an AKG C451EB, a Neumann KM86 and an AKG C414B-ULS. It gives instant gratification on the majority of kick drums for the majority of styles. I Nearly Bought One, For Beginners; The Cult: Dreamtime; Marillion: Real To Reel/Brief Encounter. So rather than trying to demonstrate some 'ready-made' gated-ambience drum sound (for which you might as well just put on one of the records listed above) I've just recorded a basic kit setup alongside a few different ambience mics to create the 'Amb' set of audio files. Jamiroquai: Return Of The Space Cowboy, Travelling Without Moving, Synkronized; Daniel Bedingfield: Gotta Get Through This; Stereo MCs: Connected; Bjork: Debut, Post; Turin Brakes: The Optimist; Lamb: Fear Of Fours; Eagle Eye Cherry: Sub Rosa. But don't trust my ears — take a listen to the 'KickDistanceTunnel' files and decide for yourself! ", Five classic snare mics were compared over the top of the drum for the 'SnareMics' audio files (left, clockwise from top left): a Neumann KM84, a Shure SM57, an AKG C451EB, a Neumann KM86 and an AKG C414B-ULS. Other producers (such as John Leckie, Ian Little, and Al Schmitt) are happy to use this mic on its own as well — although John Leckie usually uses an SM57, he adds that "sometimes I substitute the AKG C451 with the pad in if the drummer is playing with brushes or is playing lightly; then it's better to use a condenser mic... it gives you more of a 'sizzle'.". I hate the sound of the Audix. Inspired by the dual-mic approaches of Steve Churchyard, Joe Barresi and Ian Little, I also slung up additional D12, MD421 and C414B-ULS alongside the D112s while recording the 'KickHeadOffMid' files, to give an impression of the different flavours imparted by those specific mics when they're used inside the kick. It works surprising well, and would work fine with an RE20. BLACK FRIDAY on Incognetsamples.com!!! The RE20 is fairly flat and has little proximity effect and great off-axis rejection. In the middle is the Electrovoice RE20, above it is the Neumann U47 FET, and below it the AKG D12. There appears to be no real consensus amongst the producer interviews as to which of these approaches yields the best results, despite the obvious sonic differences between them. Both models are technically identical, but the D25 is built into a rather groovy-looking elasticated shockmount. Maybe 10 to 20 degrees off axis. .c_dVyWK3BXRxSN3ULLJ_t{border-radius:4px 4px 0 0;height:34px;left:0;position:absolute;right:0;top:0}._1OQL3FCA9BfgI57ghHHgV3{-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-ms-flex-pack:start;justify-content:flex-start;margin-top:32px}._1OQL3FCA9BfgI57ghHHgV3 ._33jgwegeMTJ-FJaaHMeOjV{border-radius:9001px;height:32px;width:32px}._1OQL3FCA9BfgI57ghHHgV3 ._1wQQNkVR4qNpQCzA19X4B6{height:16px;margin-left:8px;width:200px}._39IvqNe6cqNVXcMFxFWFxx{display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;margin:12px 0}._39IvqNe6cqNVXcMFxFWFxx ._29TSdL_ZMpyzfQ_bfdcBSc{-ms-flex:1;flex:1}._39IvqNe6cqNVXcMFxFWFxx .JEV9fXVlt_7DgH-zLepBH{height:18px;width:50px}._39IvqNe6cqNVXcMFxFWFxx ._3YCOmnWpGeRBW_Psd5WMPR{height:12px;margin-top:4px;width:60px}._2iO5zt81CSiYhWRF9WylyN{height:18px;margin-bottom:4px}._2iO5zt81CSiYhWRF9WylyN._2E9u5XvlGwlpnzki78vasG{width:230px}._2iO5zt81CSiYhWRF9WylyN.fDElwzn43eJToKzSCkejE{width:100%}._2iO5zt81CSiYhWRF9WylyN._2kNB7LAYYqYdyS85f8pqfi{width:250px}._2iO5zt81CSiYhWRF9WylyN._1XmngqAPKZO_1lDBwcQrR7{width:120px}._3XbVvl-zJDbcDeEdSgxV4_{border-radius:4px;height:32px;margin-top:16px;width:100%}._2hgXdc8jVQaXYAXvnqEyED{animation:_3XkHjK4wMgxtjzC1TvoXrb 1.5s ease infinite;background:linear-gradient(90deg,var(--newCommunityTheme-field),var(--newCommunityTheme-inactive),var(--newCommunityTheme-field));background-size:200%}._1KWSZXqSM_BLhBzkPyJFGR{background-color:var(--newCommunityTheme-widgetColors-sidebarWidgetBackgroundColor);border-radius:4px;padding:12px;position:relative;width:auto} The recording of the 'KickHeadOnOutside' audio files placed five AKG D112s at four inches from the kick drum's resonant head, and combined them with a Sennheiser MD421 and a Neumann KM84 miking the batter-head side. These were the earliest American gates available, and using them was pretty much an integral part of the sound.