They immediately shared an affinity for Bach's works and, in turn, Straube became Reger's most important promoter. Their collaboration not only involved concert tours, but a special "Bach–Reger–Musikfest" in June 1913, organized as the fifth Heidelberg Music Festival. 1, of 1709, and in a Fugue in E minor by Pachelbel." In 1857, having attended a Bach organ recital at the Frauenkirche, Dresden, which captivated both Clara Schumann and Joseph Joachim, Liszt's reaction had been, "Hm, dry as bones." Liszt performed the A minor fugue regularly in Berlin between 1842 and 1850. During this period there were reports that Liszt resorted to stunts in front of live audiences, which prompted possibly deserved charges of charlatanry. As further evidence of the reputation of the fugue, Stinson observes that, "Schumann attended and reviewed Mendelssohn's only public performance of the movement, Liszt heard Clara play her piano transcription of it, and Clara eventually played Liszt's transcription. That Bach could be misjudged for so long, is the greatest scandal for the “critical wisdom” of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries." Even in his later years, Liszt's A minor fugue remained one of his favourites: when he was invited to play at a private evening concert, with guests of honour Prince Albert of Prussia and his wife Princess Marie of Saxe-Altenburg, Liszt's first choice was the fugue and in his letter of thanks disclosed that Clara Schumann now as matter of course played his transcription rather than her own. A most powerful and inexhaustible remedy, not only for all those composers and musicians who suffer from “misunderstood Wagner,” but also for all those “contemporaries” who suffer from spinal maladies of all kinds. [2], According to David Schulenberg, the main sources for BWV 543 can be traced to the Berlin circle around Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and Johann Kirnberger. He was aided by the copyist Joachim Raff at various stages. The manuscript became part of the Amalienbibliothek, the music library of Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia; it is now in the Berlin State Library. 40 years later, Laurens' brother recalls their lunchtime conversation. The theme can be traced back to Bach's organ concerto in A minor BWV 593, transcribed for organ from Antonio Vivaldi's concerto for two violins, Op.3, No.8, RV 522, part of his collection L'estro armonico. )", "35. [21] In the case of the fugue of BWV 543, this drew criticism, even amongst ardent supporters of Straube, when unorthodox registration resulted in a perceived sacrifice to clarity during brilliant passage work. In the same year Liszt became close to the circle of George Sand and Adolphe Pictet, both Bach devotees. [12], Already in 1836, early in his career, it is known that Liszt had developed a reverence for Bach's great "six preludes and fugues", BWV 543–548, or the "The Great Six" fugues as they became known in the nineteenth century. Features which distinguish Bach's writing from seventeenth-century compositions include its regular tempo throughout; the careful planning of climaxes; the well-judged changes from semiquavers, to semiquaver triplets and then demisemiquavers. -  -  0.0/10 He initially was there for 13 years. Bach's contemporary relevance (“Was ist mir Johann Sebastian Bach und was bedeutet er für unsere Zeit?”); as Anderson concludes, "The brevity of Reger’s “essay,” however, does not prevent the emergence of certain themes that are developed at greater length elsewhere in his writings: the nature of progress, the “illness” of contemporary musical culture, German nationalism, the guilt of the critics." The traditional aspects are the semiquaver arpeggiated passage work with its "latent counterpoint" which incorporates a descending chromatic bass line. The semiquaver figures begin as a solo in the manual:[1][2], and then, after a lengthy demisemiquaver embellishment over a tonic pedal point, are heard again in the pedal. Complete Score (Preview) Stinson (2006) points out that this kind of gimmickry was not uncommon at that time: "Indeed, [Liszt] is reported to have accompanied Joachim in the last movement of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto with a lighted cigar in his right hand the entire time! bearb. • Switch back to classic skin, Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 3.0, http://imslp.org/index.php?title=Prelude_and_Fugue_in_A_minor,_BWV_895_(Bach,_Johann_Sebastian)&oldid=3149118, Works first published in the 19th century, Pages with commercial recordings (Naxos collection), Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 License, Montréal: Les Éditions Outremontaises, 2012.