If you’re not a fan of shooting macro photos of things that move, then perhaps this tutorial on how to take images of frost and ice is more your kind of thing. It's photography magnified, where ordinarily tiny subjects are made to look bigger than life-size in the frame. They’re easily spooked and will scuttle away if you’re not careful. It covers many of the same topics as this article, although some sections have been shortened for the sake of video length: Macro photography is close-up photography of small subjects, including things like bugs and flowers. If you’re feeling pretty fearless, then spiders can be another great subject for keen macro photographers. Macro lenses allow for closer focusing distances and will allow you to reproduce your subject at greater than life-size. Officially, you may hear that macro photography only happens when you take pictures of small subjects with a magnification of “life size” or greater. (So, if your camera sensor is one inch wide, you would be photographing something 1 inch or smaller.). Focal Length in Reverse Lens Macro Technique, Best Camera Settings for Macro Photography, Z6 II vs. Z7 II – advice on which one better for enthusiast level, To watermark or not to watermark on prints. In many genres of photography, larger pixels – and more total pixels – are preferable. Personally, my recommendation is to get a lens that can go to at least 1:2 magnification, and ideally 1:1 magnification, if you want as much flexibility as possible. What is Macro Photography? Personally, I use a 105mm macro lens. Canon cameras in particular do not calculate aperture in the same way that cameras from other brands do. A macro lens probably isn’t the right choice for someone who just wants to do some fun experimenting with macro photography, but for those who are serious about capturing the tiniest details of the smallest subjects and creating images of the highest quality, a macro lens is … If your goal is to create photos with the highest magnification possible, full-frame cameras are usually overkill for macro photography. They’re often colourful and covered in plenty of details that you can bring out with a macro lens. Macro photography is very different to other genres within nature photography. But anyone who’s tried this genre also knows its allure. In short, when your aperture is physically one size, it acts like another. So, a full-frame (FX) camera is still generally better for macro photos than a crop-sensor (DX or aps-c) camera, but by a smaller amount than in other types of photography. Before anything else, if you’re more of a visual learner, you may want to watch the following video we created to introduce macro photography. You’re going to need to adopt a new set of techniques, and that can require some work. So, a 1 cm subject is pretty big by comparison, taking up a significant portion of your photo. The colder side of macro: How to Photograph Frost & Ice. My photos have been displayed in galleries worldwide, including the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and exhibitions in London, Malta, Siena, and Beijing. The key is to pick a camera that lets you use a good macro lens, and ideally one which has as little lag as possible between seeing your subject, pressing the shutter button, and having the image recorded. Backlighting is probably my favourite type of lighting; it creates visually pleasing images that are full of atmosphere. Pick the correct … How do you take macro photos? 1. If you end up making a large print, that tiny object will appear huge – potentially billboard sized! What is macro photography? Use the menu below to go to the next section, which covers how to focus for close-up photos – one of the most important (and difficult) techniques you’ll need to learn in order to take good macro pictures. The proper macro photography definition is an image whose subject is reproduced to at least 1:1. It will help you improve your skills if you’re a…