I. i. This image occurs also in Jeremiah, Jeremiah 11:19, 'But I was like a lamb or an ox that is brought to the slaughter.'. To get what Isaiah 53:7 means based on its source text, scroll down or follow these links for … 8. c. 45. With all power at his disposal, yet as quiet and gentle as though he had no power; and with a perfect consciousness that he was going to die, as calm and as gentle as though he were ignorant of the design for which they were leading him forth. Use this table to get a word-for-word translation of the original Hebrew Scripture. but he abased himself and opened not his mouth. The unresisting endurance of the Servant. Copyright © 2020, Bible Study Tools. of Read the Scripture: Isaiah 53:7-9 He was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth; he was led like a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before its shearers is silent, so he did not open his mouth. What a striking and beautiful description! It is probable, however, that our translation has retained the correct sense. According to Jerome, the idea is that he voluntarily submitted, and that this was the cause of his sufferings. (u) "exigebatur, et ipse respondit", Gataker; "exigitur poena, et ipse affligitur", Junius & Tremellius; "quum illa exigebatur, ipse affligebatur", Piscator; "exigebatur, et ipse submittebatur", Cocceius. Proud member (Comp. Compiled & Edited by BST & Crosswalk Staff, Compiled & Edited by BibleStudyTools Staff, California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. The same phenomenon occurs when the animals are sheared. I. The yearly ritual of Passover represents the death of Jesus Christ, who was God in the flesh. Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. Isaiah 53:7. Isaiah 53:7 Translation & Meaning. And he was afflicted - Jahn and Steudel propose to render this, 'He suffered himself to be afflicted.' Hist. We can almost see here the meek and patient Redeemer led along without resistance; and amidst the clamor of the multitude that were assembled with various feelings to conduct him to death, himself perfectly silent and composed. This second part is comprised of three sections (stanzas). In our Lord’s silence before the Sanhedrin and Pilate it is allowable to trace a conscious fulfilment of Isaiah’s words (Matthew 26:62; Matthew 27:14). Quite the contrary; even in His suffering and death, Jesus was in control (John 10:18, 19:11 and 19:30). He is brought as a lamb to the slaughter - This does not mean that he was led to the slaughter as a lamb is, but that as a lamb which is led to be killed is patient and silent, so was he. But it is doubtful whether the Hebrew will bear this construction. Isaiah 53 is the fourth of the four “Servant Songs.” (The others are found in Isaiah chapters 42, 49 and 50.) Note: This is the second of a three part leadership training series (ADT) entitled, “The Godly Leader Endures through Hardship” based on Isaiah 52:13-53:12. Compare 1 Peter 2:23, 'Who when he was reviled, reviled not again.' The word ענה ‛ânâh, in Niphil, means to be afflicted, to suffer, be oppressed or depressed Psalm 119:107, and the idea here is, probably, that he was greatly distressed and afflicted. 1 Peter 2:24 quotes Isaiah 53:5, "By his wounds we are healed," and 1 Peter 2:25 refers to Isaiah 53:6, "We all, like sheep, have gone astray." Nat. 3. c. 5. As a lamb to the slaughter.—It is suggestive, as bearing both on the question of authorship, and that of partial fulfilment, that Jeremiah (Jeremiah 11:19) appropriates the description to himself. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. Jesus fulfilled this. It was opened only to bless those that cursed him, and to pray for his enemies and murderers. II. He made no resistance. This is an agricultural simile based on the truth that a goat slaughtered in the traditional manner responds with blood-curdling cries that can be heard a mile away; but a sheep submits to the butcher's knife silently. yet he opened not his mouth; against the oppressor that did him the injury, nor murmured at the affliction that was heavy upon him: or, "and he opened not his mouth"; against the justice of God, and the demand that was made upon him, as the surety of his people; he owned the obligation he had laid himself under; he paid the debt, and bore the punishment without any dispute or hesitation: "he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb"; or, "as a sheep to the slaughter, and as an ewe before her shearer" (w); these figurative phrases are expressive, not only of the harmlessness and innocence of Christ, as considered in himself, but of his meekness and patience in suffering, and of his readiness and willingness to be sacrificed in the room and stead of his people; he went to the cross without any reluctance, which; when there was any in the sacrifice, it was reckoned a bad omen among the Heathens, yea, such were not admitted to be offered (x); but Christ went as willingly to be sacrificed as a lamb goes to the slaughter house, and was as silent under his sufferings as a sheep while under the hands of its shearers; he was willing to be stripped of all he had, as a shorn sheep, and to be slaughtered and sacrificed as a lamb, for the sins of his people: so he opened not his mouth: not against his enemies, by way of threatening or complaint; nor even in his own defence; nor against the justice of God, as bearing hard upon him, not sparing him, but demanding and having full satisfaction; nor against his people and their sins, for whom he suffered; see 1 Peter 2:23. opened not … mouth—Jer 11:19; and David in Ps 38:13, 14; 39:9, prefiguring Messiah (Mt 26:63; 27:12, 14; 1Pe 2:23). The blood was a sign to the death angel to "pass over" their homes when it went through Egypt. Each of these stanzas are represented separately in its own web page. and … afflicted—or, and yet He suffered, or bore Himself patiently, &c. [Hengstenberg and Maurer]. I. How tender and how true! He uttered no complaint. “Openeth not his mouth”: The Servant will utter no protest and will be utterly submissive to those who oppress Him. i. He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he. He did not use the language of reviling when he was reviled, nor return upon people the evils which they were inflicting on him (compare Psalm 39:9). He was oppressed, and he was afflicted He was injuriously treated by the Jews; they used him very ill, and handled him very roughly; he was oppressed and afflicted, both in body and mind, with their blows, and with their reproaches; he was afflicted, indeed, both by God and men: or rather it may be rendered, "it was exacted", required, and demanded, "and he answered" F21, or "was afflicted"; justice finding the sins of men on him, laid on him by imputation, and voluntarily received by him, as in the preceding verse, demanded satisfaction of him; and he being the surety of his people, was responsible for them, and did answer, and gave the satisfaction demanded: the debt they owed was required, the payment of it was called for, and he accordingly answered, and paid the whole, every farthing, and cancelled the bond; the punishment of the sins of his people was exacted of him, and he submitted to bear it, and did bear it in his own body on the tree; this clearly expresses the doctrine of Christ's satisfaction: yet he opened not his mouth; against the oppressor that did him the injury, nor murmured at the affliction that was heavy upon him: or, "and he opened not his mouth"; against the justice of God, and the demand that was made upon him, as the surety of his people; he owned the obligation he had laid himself under; he paid the debt, and bore the punishment without any dispute or hesitation: "he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb"; or, "as a sheep to the slaughter, and as an ewe before her shearer" F23; these figurative phrases are expressive, not only of the harmlessness and innocence of Christ, as considered in himself, but of his meekness and patience in suffering, and of his readiness and willingness to be sacrificed in the room and stead of his people; he went to the cross without any reluctance, which; when there was any in the sacrifice, it was reckoned a bad omen among the Heathens, yea, such were not admitted to be offered F24; but Christ went as willingly to be sacrificed as a lamb goes to the slaughter house, and was as silent under his sufferings as a sheep while under the hands of its shearers; he was willing to be stripped of all he had, as a shorn sheep, and to be slaughtered and sacrificed as a lamb, for the sins of his people: so he opened not his mouth: not against his enemies, by way of threatening or complaint; nor even in his own defence; nor against the justice of God, as bearing hard upon him, not sparing him, but demanding and having full satisfaction; nor against his people and their sins, for whom he suffered; see ( 1 Peter 2:23 ) .