The, Search on departmental websites, such as the, Know the admission process and timeline for the veterinary school you’re interested in. Vet school can and will consume all your free time, stress you out, exhaust you, demoralize you, inspire you, delight you, and change your life forever. Here are five things you need to know to prepare for veterinary school. Know the admission process and timeline for the veterinary school you’re interested in. JetsonVR – Virtual Reality Canine Dissection – Now Available on Windows Mixed Reality. Search on departmental websites, such as the College of Biological Sciences website, to find faculty members who are doing research related to veterinary medicine. Once you’re in, most veterinary schools are a minimum of four-year programs, where the fourth year is spent doing clinical rotations at veterinary clinics or hospitals, and many veterinary programs combine clinical experience throughout the four-year curriculum. The early bird gets the worm, and into vet school. Applications from the Veterinary Medical Application Service, which is how most schools accept applications, are available online in May (paper applications are not available), and the deadline to submit is in September. How to Prepare as a College Undergraduate. Maintain a high GPA Gain as much broad exposure to veterinary medicine as possible. It’s also a key element of your vet school application. This five-week intensive summer program is designed to provide college-level students with activities that will enhance their preparation to veterinary school. The Internship and Career Center can help you find possible opportunities. Spare yourself the hassle of having to take extra courses or semesters by being aware of all that’s required. If so, then a career in veterinary medicine might be the right next step for you. Volunteerism can not only help you prepare for veterinary school, it can also help you discover if it is the right career path for you and connect you with people who could serve as future references. Students should try to gain as much relevant experience as possible as it is crucial to a competitive application. If you are considering attending veterinary school, it's important to know the many factors that could affect your decision. The popularity of veterinary medicine has created a highly competitive admissions process for the available seats in each vet school class. It can be difficult to get accepted to vet school, but it can be well worth the effort in the long term. You can also try to enroll in the School of Veterinary Medicine’s Pre-College Program. Gain as much experience as possible. Veterinary medicine is an extremely popular career choice in the animal industry, even though it requires a challenging, demanding education. “These types of clubs offer support and education regarding preparing for veterinary school.” 2. Practical experience is highly valuable for developing an understanding of the veterinary profession. Preparing in advance will give you more time to build a strong application and can reduce the stress of the application process. Here’s some tips to help you prepare: Check the program details for the schools you are interested in applying to, and make sure to take any pre-vet courses they require. No matter where you apply, veterinary school is a competitive process. UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, like many vet schools around the country, requires a minimum number of hours (180) of animal, veterinary and biomedical work and/or experience. While there is no pre-veterinary medicine major at UC Davis, you still can (and must) take a required set of courses prior to the end of the spring quarter before matriculation, if you want to get into veterinary school. UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, like many vet schools around the country, requires a minimum number of hours (180) of animal, veterinary and biomedical work and/or experience. Your choice of college will depend primarily on what best suits your needs, but you should also consider criteria such as GPA, SAT, and ACT requirements. Read the School of Veterinary Medicine’s “So You Want to be a Veterinarian?” article. Get Started in High School For a career in veterinary medicine, a high school student should develop a strong background in biology, chemistry, and physics. Know the admission process and timeline for the veterinary school you’re interested in. After high school, some pre-vet courses may be required such as additional biology, chemistry and physics, as well as mathematics, genetics, and more. Or visit the Undergraduate Research Center to prepare for approaching and interviewing with faculty members whose labs you'd like to join. While there is no pre-veterinary medicine major at UC Davis, you still can (and must) take a required set of courses prior to the end of the spring quarter before matriculation, if you want to get into veterinary school. Applications from the. Applications from the Veterinary Medical Application Service, which is how most schools accept applications, are available online in May (paper applications are not available), and the deadline to submit is in September. (Have your transcripts and letters of recommendations read… In high school, focus on taking courses in biology, chemistry and physics. Getting involved in campus clubs and other extracurricular activities is also highly recommended. Veterinary schools around the country each have their own list of pre-entrance course requirements. Volunteering at an animal hospital or local shelter is a great option, as it will also help you determine whether the veterinary career is the right path for you. After high school, some pre-vet courses may be required such as additional biology, chemistry and physics, as well as mathematics, genetics, and more. (Have your transcripts and letters of recommendations ready by then too.) Gain a solid background in math and science. While many schools don’t have much experience with vet school applicants, they can certainly conduct a . Not sure where to start? These can provide you with the opportunity to gain leadership and teamwork skills, and to expand your network of peers. “So You Want to be a Veterinarian?” article. There are numerous career options for people with a DVM. Preparing for Vet School. If cramming got you through undergrad, you will be disappointed with the results the same approach achieves in veterinary school.