The third and final technique we’ll cover today is ORTF. Use these templates as a foundation and get creative! For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. (i play a 4 piece with hats ride and crash). But here is the question. Drums are generally tricky to both record and mix. The spaced pair is the other of the most common overhead drum miking techniques, although there are an infinite variety of ways to do it. Question about some micing practice for ya. I almost never direct mic hi-hats or ride cymbals. A small diaphragm like a ? For this technique we recommend AT4040 mics. Audio-Technica has 3 basic techniques for setting up your overhead mics for recording drums. I'll be doing some demoing at home for our new record and I was hoping I could get some opinions. This method offers a phase coherent stereo image similar to the X-Y configuration, but with more width and cymbals relative to the rest of the drum kit. The way you present it....every measure is welcome. The second technique is the X-Y configuration. This sounds like a lot of effort for just demos but. Today, we’ll look at three simple techniques that can be applied to most setups, regardless of style. The farther apart you position the microphones, the wider your stereo image will become. Wherever you place them, make sure the overhead mics are equidistant from the snare drum. How are you setting up your overhead mics? Tell us about your setup in the comments section below! I know it sounds … Do a spaced pair 5 inches from the ride and crash? Position them at a higher elevation for a more balanced sound. Drum overhead placement . For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Hey. Could be that it turns out nice. Audio-Technica has 3 basic techniques for setting up your overhead mics for recording drums. 3 Basic Techniques for Overhead Drum Mic Setup. Place them directly over the snare to keep it centered in the stereo field, and keep them high enough above the cymbals that they never physically pass through the element. Hey folks. You don.t know if your limited with acoustics above. Please help. It's a big boxy, tall cement room. Then listen, and if it sounds extremely unbalanced it's either the drummer or the mic placement. XY/Coincident Pair . Drum Miking Techniques – An In-Studio Tutorial Contents. I would get some heavy blankets and gobos and surround the drums. I'll probably analyze the room and put some treatment and traps that I can. Position the mics low above the cymbals to remove emphasis from the rest of the kit. Drums, studio rooms, and microphones vary so much that there’s no single right answer. Hey folks. What would you do for overhead placement in a tall bad sounding room? Now a good baffle/gobo is a horse of a different color. Measuring Your Stereo Array. The trickiest part of this tricky instrument is the overheads. For me there’s a bit of procedure that doesn’t vary — I do the same thing essentially every time. I'll probably analyze the room and put some treatment and traps that I can. Back to the M160's for a second...they are hypercardioid, so they really focus down on the kit and reject the room more than most other options. Frequency-agile True Diversity UHF Wireless Systems. I'll probably analyze the room and put some treatment and traps that I can. Perhaps more than any other method tested, the spaced pair approach requires care to avoid phasing problems. The spaced pair configuration offers a great deal of flexibility in placement. Hello. A single pair of multipattern condenser microphones can provide at least five distinct overhead drum miking choices with surprisingly different sonic characteristics. You can get a great sound, and of course you don't have to be concerned about phase with another overhead mic. (i play a 4 piece with hats ride and crash). C 414 isn't a small diaphragm. Work on that and repeat until you have a decent sound to start with, then start adding close mics. Here we have a pair of AT4050 microphones set to cardioid positioned above the kit. Having a close mic on the ride or any other cymbal should be the least of your worries at this point. After some well placed treatment I would consider trying some ribbons as they provide very good rejection in the nulls of the figure 8 pattern. First, the room is awful. Citronic 188.025UK Studio Microphone Arc Screen: Amazon.co.uk: Musical Instruments, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZOVZQgXl9k. I can get a hold of a drum shield. The choice of mics and their placement around the drum kit can have a massive impact upon the recorded sound and, while there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to mic placement and choices, here we'll look at some of the most popular options for getting quick and easy results. It's a big boxy, tall cement room. But here is the question. I'll be doing some demoing at home for our new record and I was hoping I could get some opinions He offers up overhead miking tips, how to reduce bleed of the ever-present hi hat, why he uses multiple microphones on the kick drum, and more. Do a spaced pair 5 inches from the ride and crash? JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. Height-wise - when I measure out, I am usually around 43" from snare center...a little higher than you might see the Coles 4038 or AKG D19 on Ringo's kit. If one of a pair of … So just kill ALL reflections you can haha. My band is going into the studio next week and I was wondering if anyone could give us some pointers on overhead mic placements. Question about some micing practice for ya. Hey folks. A small diaphragm like a c414? But what’s even easier is to simply throw up one overhead mic to capture the entire kit, rather than two. You have absolutely no phase issues because you aren’t trying to capture an instrument with two mics, but with one. Would that do any good? With these three basic drum mic setup techniques, you can experiment to find the perfect stereo image. 13 correct ways to mic up a drum kit. That type of room as you wisely have thought is pretty well useless. As for placement, check out this vid by George Massenberg. I am using two omni mics (Avenson STO-2) for my overheads and wanted opinions on how to p Or rolling with the punches and get a wider stereo image and risk some awful "ping". ... "best placement for drum overheads" For slow thrash metal till 320 BPM slightly below the central forward portion of the lower jaw. Of course this can be avoided with careful placement and measurement. I'll tell ya though...I also really like a mono overhead a la Ringo. Not sure what is available to rent though. We recommend a pair of AE5100 microphones mounted on a stereo bar. Hey folks. I will soon be doing a recording which involves drums. A great way to start is the recorderman method or the Glyn Johns technique. I've had success with 414's, and regularly use my new pair of M160's. Something like a shure 81? From microphone selection to placement, this is a crash course in miking drums! The overheads will cause the sound of your close-mics to change no matter what, so you might as well make sure that the change is for the better. Not saying I wouldn't - I just find that most of the time the tracks never get used. Please help. However you can change your cookie settings at any time. As an example, let’s say the snare drum resonates at 400Hz. Question about some micing practice for ya. That works well for rejecting undesirable elements in the room IME. Use two cardioid condenser mics arranged with the elements as close together as possible at a 90-degree angle. Something like a shure 81? Accessing our website tells us you agree to our use of cookies. From 420 BPM on between the legs, and above 480 BPM you don't need a overhead at all. First, the room is awful. But put the drummer into a cabinet for … Widen your image by widening the gap between your microphones and make it narrow by bringing them together. I'll be doing some demoing at home for our new record and I was hoping I could get some opinions It all starts with relationships to your kick and snare. Im a fan of little drums and mucho cymbals with overheads (though i like cymbals real low in the mix). Question about some micing practice for ya. The wavelength of a 400Hz tone is about 33 inches. What would you do for overhead placement in a tall bad sounding room? Even if you go so far as to filter all of the lower frequencies from your overheads (a common practice for some), there … Question about some micing practice for ya. I close mic the ride a lot. This is another coincident pair of cardioid condenser mics positioned 17 cm apart, angled 110 degrees from each other. Recording drums is not an exact science because no two sessions are the same. Drum Shields sound awful to me. Then there’s a bit that varies depending on exactly what’s happening in the context of the music. If you're just trying to demo out some songs to prepare for recording then just stick a mic [I'd go with an LDC] in front of the kit and record it to start with. The overhead microphone, which is closest to the hihat is in this placement moved further away from the hihat, which can be a lifesaver if the hihat is a bit overbearing when played hard - since there is less of it in the overheads, it makes it easier for you to control with a close mic.